Phonics

Our children begin the Read Write Inc Phonics programme when they start at The Cathedral School in Foundation. 

Your child learns a new sound every day accompanied by a handwriting rhyme which helps them to remember how to form the letter shape when writing it.  For example, if they were learning the phoneme (sound) ‘a’, they would also learn the rhyme ’round the apple and down the leaf’ when they start to write their letter.

a

As your child learns each sound (phoneme), they are taught how to blend the sounds together to make two and three letters words (CVC words, consonant, vowel, consonant such as dog).   Alongside this, your child will start to read green words.  These are words which can be sounded out and blended like ‘dog’, ‘cat’ and ‘red words’  (tricky words) which can’t be sounded out phonetically like ‘to’, ‘go’.

When the children have learnt the single sounds they begin to move on to two and three letter sounds. These are called digraphs (2 letters making 1 sound like ‘ea’  in tea) and trigraphs (3 letters making 1 sound like ‘igh’ in light).

Useful Terminology:

blend –  to draw individual sounds together to pronounce a word, e.g. s-n-a-p, blended together, reads snap.

digraph – A digraph is a single sound, or phoneme, which is represented by two letters like ‘ow’ as in  ‘s-n-ow’ reading ‘snow’.

grapheme – A grapheme is a letter or a number of letters which represent a sound (phoneme) in a word.

grapheme-phoneme correspondence (GPC) – the relationship between sounds and the letters which represent those sounds; also known as ‘letter-sound correspondences’.  This means that your child will be able to recognise and/or identify the written form of a letter when listening to the sound.

phoneme – A phoneme is the smallest unit of sound in speech, this may be one letter, or a group of two or three letters which make one sound.

segment – to split up a word into its individual phonemes (sounds) in order to spell it, e.g. the word ‘cat’ has three phonemes: c – a – t,

sound buttons – the number of phonemes (sounds) in a word, your child will be encouraged to draw a dot under a single letter to denote the number of sounds, if it is a digraph they will underline both sounds instead of drawing a dot. For example ay in play.

split digraph – two letters, split by another letter, but which make one sound, e.g. a-e as in make or i-e in site.

trigraph –  A trigraph is a phoneme which consists of three letters like ‘air’ as in ‘hair‘.

sound buttons 2

WHAT IS READ WRITE INC PHONICS?
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UNDERSTANDING PHONICS
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HOW TO SAY THE SOUNDS.
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WHY READ TO YOUR CHILD?
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Useful Links:  

http://www.oxfordowl.co.uk/reading-owl/at-school

http://www.phonicsplay.co.uk/

Apps: 

Hairyletters 

Pocketphonic 

Teach Your Monster to Read